Jackie Robinson


Jackie Robinson is a famous baseball player who remains famous forever due to the fact that he was the first African-American to be allowed to play in the major league baseball team. He began playing for the Brooklyn Dodgers as the first baseman in 1947. He was the first black man to play in the major leagues since the 1880s. The doctors were the first team to end racial segregation which had remained prominent for the previous six decades. Jackie Robinson was popular for his use of nonviolence and his talent. He had an exceptional baseball career. Over the 10 seasons that he played, six of them went to the World Series. He contributed to the 1955 championship for the Dodgers in the World Series. He was selected six consecutive times for the All-Star games. In 1947 he won the major-league baseball award for rookie of the year. In 1949 he received the most valuable player award for the National League, and he was the first black player to receive that award.

He was inducted in 1962 into the baseball Hall of Fame. His uniform number was officially retired universally in 1997. This was universally retired from all league teams. This made him the first professional athlete across all sports in America to be given this honor. In fact, into thousand four the major-league baseball team adopted annual Jackie Robinson day wherein each player on every team across the league where's Jackie Robinson's number.

Jackie Robinson was famous for his pursuit outside of the baseball diamond. In addition to being the first black man to play in the major leaks he was also the first black television analyst for the major leagues and he was the first black man to hold the position of vice president for the major American corporation. He established the freedom national Bank in 1960 which became the first American, African own financial institution, which was based out of Harlem. For his achievements both on the baseball field and off he was posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold medal and the presidential Medal of Freedom.

His baseball career did not start with the Dodgers of course; it started in Kansas City in 1945 when he was given a chance to play professionally in the Negro leagues. He accepted a contract and played but was frustrated with this experience. The disorganization in the use of gambling within the Negro league appalled him. His hectic travel schedule places the burden on his relationships personally but with his statistics he was able to pursue additional post league interests.